‘Emma is to Clueless’ as ‘The Great Gatsby is to The Notebook’

I recently watched the original The Great Gatsby (Of course it was the original, the other one hasn’t come out yet. Silly me. Sorry.). As I watched Robert Redford and Mia Farrow embark on their affair that could be from a fairy tale, I realized how stupid people are.

Yeah, change of tone.

Gatsby and Daisy are fools. Crazy, pampered, delusional fools. Just because your skirt gets shorter and you can fall into a fountain drunk, doesn’t mean you can get away with adultery. Now I’m not saying that I didn’t want them to end up together. Because I did. I just want to point out how crazy it is for me to want that for them. I know it’s a fictional story, but it still bothers me.

When I was watching the movie, I was rooting for them to be together. I justified their cheating with the fact that her husband cheats too, they are each others true loves, they met before she got married, they were meant for each other, etc., but it’s not moral and there is nothing that you can say that excuses what they were all doing, lying and cheating.

Side Note: I know I sound like some Sanctity of Marriage Act fanatic, but I’m not. I don’t believe in true love, I don’t think everyone has to stay married to each other, divorce is a perfectly fine thing to have. It’s sad when it happens, but if you can’t get along with your wife/husband and you are miserable, there is no point in staying miserable together. You should just go for the person you like after you get a divorce. You decided to get married and you should have a moral obligation to uphold the vows you took when you made that decision.

I know Daisy’s husband is a skeezy cheater too, but two wrongs don’t make a right. This applies to the narrator, Nick Carraway, as well. He sees all of the wrong doings of all of his friends and does nothing but aid their self-destructive plans. He knows what Daisy and Gatsby are doing and not only says nothing against it, he helps them get together behind Daisy’s husbands back. He doesn’t say anything to stop them from continuing to see each other even when people start to get suspicious. *SPOILERS* (though most of you have probably seen or read this story by now) He doesn’t tell anyone that Daisy was the one who killed her husband’s mistress. And finally, he doesn’t reprimand Daisy and her husband for running off on a vacation while they get their house redone like Gatsby hadn’t just been killed on Daisy’s husband’s command. IT IS A LOAD OF BS.

Most people say that Daisy is the most disappointing character in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, but  I say it’s Nick Carraway because of his failure to grow some balls and tell people what’s what. He could have tried to stop Daisy or told her off for acting like she hadn’t just lost the love of her life, but he didn’t and that is just sad and wimpy.

Surprisingly, I found my favorite character to be Jordan because she knew what she wanted, how to get it, knew what the world was like, accepted it, and used her knowledge to the best of her abilities. She was smart and fully stayed out of other peoples’ business. She hung out with Gatsby and Daisy, but never once tried to encourage them or get them together. All she said was that Daisy deserved to be happy. She never said how that should happen.

Now that I have ranted about the whole movie I am going to get to the point of the post. Yeah sorry, you guys, still haven’t got there.

As I watched the movie I realized how similar it was to The Notebook by Nicholas Sparks. Nicholas Sparks basically recreated The Great Gatsby. I have yet to read The Great Gatsby, but it is on my to-read list so I will get back to you on the book version’s similarity to each other, but the movies are basically the same up until the ending.

I don’t really feel like explaining this through typing because I’m just too lazy to do that right now, so here’s a Ven Diagram:

Screen Shot 2013-04-23 at 11.39.28 AM

See, basically the same storyline.

So yeah. Not that I have anything against movie recreations, I loved the way they plopped the story of Emma into the adolescent, social, and fabulous world of Cher in Clueless. Love that movie.

Has anyone else noticed that? Or is what I’m saying completely wrong and I’m making myself look like an idiot?

Kisses. xxx

P.s. I will come back with an update on the similarities of the books sometime.

P.p.s. Sorry my ven is small. Click on it and you should be able to see what I typed in the diagram better.

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